One in five adults in New Zealand experience some degree of hearing loss. However, very few do anything to address it. You probably already get your eyes checked, so why not get your hearing tested as well? We understand how important your hearing is and we want to make sure that you continue to enjoy it for as long as possible. The information here will help you to understand hearing loss, how your ears work and what we can do to help.

Benefits of good hearing

Whether you’re attending a business meeting or listening to family and friends, hearing well is vital. For most people, it’s not until their hearing begins to deteriorate that they realise just how important it is. Untreated hearing loss can become a significant problem, impacting your relationships with others, participation in the community and even your independence.

If you do have hearing loss, hearing aids can vastly improve your daily life thanks to major technological advances. Today’s digital hearing aids work more effectively than ever and look discreet. Some are so small that people can't even tell you’re wearing them.

Hearing loss can be gradual

For most people, hearing begins to deteriorate from the mid-thirties and it usually declines slowly over time meaning it can be hard to detect. The small, sensitive hair-like cells within the inner ear simply get worn out over the years.

When this happens, you don’t simply go deaf, but it becomes more and more difficult to understand sounds clearly, particularly speech. Social environments such as a cafe or restaurant can be even more challenging, as the background noises make it harder to hear.

How do I know if I need to see an audiology professional?

Senior Audiologist, Kathryn Launchbury discusses some tell-tale signs that may indicate that an appointment with an audiology professional would be beneficial.

Telltale signs of hearing loss

  • Do you turn up the TV or radio louder than is comfortable for others?
  • Is it sometimes difficult to hear what the person on the end of the telephone is saying?
  • Do you have to ask people to repeat themselves?
  • When you’re in a pub or restaurant, is it hard to follow what the person you’re talking to is saying?
  • Have you started avoiding places where you can’t hear properly?

If you are experiencing any of these signs, we advise you to act as early as possible and see an audiology professional.

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